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NC Cooperative Extension Service_Conference Listening Session_11-6-13

Extension is Planning
for Another Century of Success.

The N.C. Cooperative Extension Service has launched a strategic visioning initiative to evaluate the organization’s business model and chart a course through choppy economic waters. NCCES has seen recurring budget cuts of $20 million since 2000, resulting in the loss of roughly 90 positions over the past four years.

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NC Cooperative Extension Service_Conference Listening Session_11-6-13

Extension is Planning
for Another Century of Success.

The N.C. Cooperative Extension Service has launched a strategic visioning initiative to evaluate the organization’s business model and chart a course through choppy economic waters. NCCES has seen recurring budget cuts of $20 million since 2000, resulting in the loss of roughly 90 positions over the past four years.

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Kudzu bug on leaf

Imported Pests

The kudzu bug, an imported pest from Asia that feeds primarily on kudzu and legumes, was confirmed in Craven County.  Scientifically known as Megacopta Cribraria, this brown and white, oval to almost square-shaped, pea-sized insect was first reported in Georgia in 2009.  Kudzu bugs may be found in very large numbers in agricultural fields and in or around homes. This insect will be more than just a nuisance. Learn more about kudzu bug management for both home owners and agricultural producers.

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NC Cooperative Extension Service

Certified Safe Farm
Reviews Available for Craven County Agricultural Producers

Craven County is participating in the “Certified Safe Farms” effort funded through the NC Tobacco Trust Fund to provide agricultural producers the opportunity to receive farm safety reviews from NC Cooperative Extension.  These reviews include an inspection of all equipment, working areas, storage facilities, tools and procedures.  A non-regulatory, written report is provided to all participants.  These reports outline existing safety measures found on the farm as well as any potential improvements.  This educational effort originally was conducted in Iowa.  Participants in Iowa reported increased safety on the farm; improved health and safety of family and farm workers; decreased insurance claims; and, decreased liability insurance cost.  Similar results have been reported from participants within North Carolina. Participants of the program that successfully score 85% or higher for safety farm reviews are provided a certificate and signage designating the farm as a “Certified Safe Farm”.  Additionally, participants are provided the opportunity to increase this basic level of certification to a “Gold Star Farm” by participating with AgriSafe of North Carolina to include the health screenings of family members and workers.  This basic health screening covers checks for blood pressure, blood sugar, lung capacity, eye exams, hearing exams and more.  Additionally, farmers may choose to include medical clearance exams and fit testing for personal protective equipment (PPE) such as respirators. To encourage early producer enrollment, a cost-share of 50% (up to $500) is provided to those enrolling within the initial stages.  Farm reviews must be scheduled in advance with local Extension offices participating.  Additionally, the producer must be present during examination of equipment and tools.  Time needed for these reviews will vary by farming operation depending upon the size of the operation and equipment. To learn more about the program or email Margaret Ross (margaret_ross@ncsu.edu) or Mike Carroll (mike_carroll@ncsu.edu).  To schedule a farm review, contact Lisa Wimpfheimer at Craven County Extension at (252) 633-1477.

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Wheat Field

Craven County
Voluntary Agriculture District

Learn more about the Craven County Voluntary Agriculture District (VAD).

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NC Cooperative Extension Service

Historically High
Corn Yield

2013 Season Results in Historical High Corn Yield for Craven County The twenty-year corn production average for Craven County has been between 80-90 bushels of corn per acre.  With advances in technology and breeding, this average (excluding the drought of 2008) has recently increased to 115-125 bushel per acres.   However, in 2013, ideal conditions resulted in historically high corn yields estimated to average between 155-165 bushels per acre.  Furthermore, growers report isolated farm yield above 200 bushel per acres.  In fact, this year’s unofficial highest corn yield entry into the NC Corn Yield Contest from Craven County is 237 bushel per acre. Typically, drought stress during critical stages of corn development and excessively high temperatures limit corn yield.  However, in 2013, rainfall was abundant to excessive throughout the growing season.  Many producers reported weekly rainfall between 0.5-2 inches.  Furthermore, the month of June was mild.  Typical temperatures above 95 degree Fahrenheit simply did not exist. Thus, on well-drained soils, historical corn yields were possible. Not all soils produce crops equally.  Poorly drained soils typically hold soil water for plant use during periods of drought or excessive heat thus benefiting yield.  However, mild temperatures, excessive rainfall and continuous cloudy conditions resulted in excessive soil moisture for these soils.  Excessive soil moisture limits soil oxygen and leads to loss of nitrogen from dentrification.  Too, excessive soil moisture often results in higher disease incidence.  Thus corn yield was greatly reduced on poorly drained soils.  Producing greater yield were soils with moderate soil drainage. Not all soils within Craven County are suited for corn production.  Extremely sandy, well-drained soils do not hold enough water for high corn yield.  Too, should intense rainfall occur, these soils simply leach nutrients creating nutrient deficiencies that limit yield.  Recent plant breeding has shown promise of new varieties more tolerant of drought and heat stress.  Promises of 80-120 bushel per acre or more may soon be possible even on sandier soils.   Until then, understanding suitable soil water holding capacity and managing critical stages of corn development to match historical rainfall events are two of the most important management decisions for corn production within Craven County. For additional information on successful corn production within Craven County, visit Keys to Successful Corn Production For a general corn production guidelines visit The North Carolina Corn Production Guide

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NEWS View All

PEDv – What you need to know

By: Margaret Ross, Livestock Agent – Craven & Jones Counties                 There is a lot of talk right now about PED virus – Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea MORE »

Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)

Article By: Margaret Ross Photo Crdit: en.wikipedia.org Adapted from: NCDA & CS Veterinary Division – Animal Health Programs – Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) & information from Dr. Linnea Theisen, Eastern Equine Associates Mobile MORE »

Refuge Requirements for Corn

A naturally found soil bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), has been used as a safe, economical pesticide to control caterpillar pest for many years.  When ingested by caterpillars, it has been proven to be highly effective.  MORE »

Monitoring Flue-Cured Tobacco Heat Exchangers

The US Tobacco Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) Program established the requirement to assess heat exchangers within flue-cured tobacco barns for potential combustion products leaking into the curing chamber. Primarily, industry is concerned with MORE »

Local Tractor Supply Store Wins Award

The New Bern Tractor Supply Company (TSC) store was recently recognized for winning the Paper Clover “Reserve Grand Champion” award for achieving the highest transaction percentage in their region during the 4-H/TSC Fall MORE »

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EVENTS View All
4-H County Council MeetingThu Apr 24, 2014
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM— Tomorrow
Neon Ninjas 4-H Club MeetingThu May 1, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM Where:
MCCS Community Center, Cherry Point MCAS
— 1 week away
Green Bears 4-H ClubWed May 14, 2014
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Where:
Neuse Forrest Presbyterian Church, 2011 Old Cherry Point Road, New Bern NC
— 3 weeks away
4-H County Council MeetingThu May 22, 2014
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM— 4 weeks away
Neon Ninjas 4-H Club MeetingThu Jun 5, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM Where:
MCCS Community Center, Cherry Point MCAS
— 1 month away
Green Bears 4-H ClubWed Jun 11, 2014
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Where:
Neuse Forrest Presbyterian Church, 2011 Old Cherry Point Road, New Bern NC
— 2 months away
4-H County Council MeetingThu Jun 26, 2014
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM— 2 months away
Neon Ninjas 4-H Club MeetingThu Jul 3, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM Where:
MCCS Community Center, Cherry Point MCAS
— 2 months away
More Events