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NC Cooperative Extension Service

Selecting a Wheat
Variety

To ensure high yield and low management, proper wheat varieties need to match soils, anticipated planting date, potential Hessian Fly infestations and known disease problems. NC State University provides annual evaluations of the yield and characteristics of commercial wheat varieties. This year nine different companies provided varieties with yields 95-100+ bushel/acres when averaged across the seven test sites. Over 92 wheat varieties were evaluated. One area often overlooked when choosing a variety is the varietal resistance. Usually, selecting a variety with slightly lower yield potential but greater resistance decreases management input and production cost.  Common diseases in this area include Powdery Mildew, Leaf Rust and Stripe Rust. However, whether any of these particular diseases cause major yield loss will depend upon how early, if at all, the disease develops, the wheat stage at the time of disease incidence and subsequent weather conditions after discovery. Conversely, common soil borne diseases that do not depend upon weather circumstance are Wheat Mosaic and Wheat Spindle Streak. These diseases persists within the soil even with crop rotation so varieties susceptible to these diseases should not be planted in fields once the presence of these diseases in the soils has been confirmed. Additionally, over the past few years, Fusarium Head Blight and Stagnosporia Blotch have sporadically been a concern for some fields but no commercial variety has been rated for resistance to these diseases. Thus, scouting for proper identification, observance of weather patterns, review of NCSU alerts, monitoring disease forecast and timely fungicide application are the best means of management. Lastly, for this area, risk management should also include differing maturity dates to avoid the risk of severe loss due to a late frost. A selection that provides an overview of varietal disease resistance for commercially available wheat varieties, Table 4. Characteristics of Commercial Wheat Varieties Across North Carolina Performance Trials from the 2015 North Carolina Measured Crop Performance Small Grain publication is provided below. The entire 2015 North Carolina Measured Crop Performance Small Grain publication is available to download HERE. Suggestions and production details for wheat is found at the NCSU website, http://www.smallgrains.ncsu.edu/production-guide.html 2015 Commercial Wheat Variety Characteristics[/caption] Email the author at: mike_carroll@ncsu.edu Follow the author on Twitter at: @mcarroll_craven The use of brand names and any mention or listing of commercial products or services in this publication does not imply endorsement by the NC Cooperative Extension Service nor discrimination against similar products or services not mentioned. Individuals who use agricultural chemicals are responsible for ensuring that the intended use complies with current regulations and conform to the product label. Be sure to examine a current product label before applying any product.

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NC Cooperative Extension Service

Selecting a Wheat
Variety

To ensure high yield and low management, proper wheat varieties need to match soils, anticipated planting date, potential Hessian Fly infestations and known disease problems. NC State University provides annual evaluations of the yield and characteristics of commercial wheat varieties. This year nine different companies provided varieties with yields 95-100+ bushel/acres when averaged across the seven test sites. Over 92 wheat varieties were evaluated. One area often overlooked when choosing a variety is the varietal resistance. Usually, selecting a variety with slightly lower yield potential but greater resistance decreases management input and production cost.  Common diseases in this area include Powdery Mildew, Leaf Rust and Stripe Rust. However, whether any of these particular diseases cause major yield loss will depend upon how early, if at all, the disease develops, the wheat stage at the time of disease incidence and subsequent weather conditions after discovery. Conversely, common soil borne diseases that do not depend upon weather circumstance are Wheat Mosaic and Wheat Spindle Streak. These diseases persists within the soil even with crop rotation so varieties susceptible to these diseases should not be planted in fields once the presence of these diseases in the soils has been confirmed. Additionally, over the past few years, Fusarium Head Blight and Stagnosporia Blotch have sporadically been a concern for some fields but no commercial variety has been rated for resistance to these diseases. Thus, scouting for proper identification, observance of weather patterns, review of NCSU alerts, monitoring disease forecast and timely fungicide application are the best means of management. Lastly, for this area, risk management should also include differing maturity dates to avoid the risk of severe loss due to a late frost. A selection that provides an overview of varietal disease resistance for commercially available wheat varieties, Table 4. Characteristics of Commercial Wheat Varieties Across North Carolina Performance Trials from the 2015 North Carolina Measured Crop Performance Small Grain publication is provided below. The entire 2015 North Carolina Measured Crop Performance Small Grain publication is available to download HERE. Suggestions and production details for wheat is found at the NCSU website, http://www.smallgrains.ncsu.edu/production-guide.html 2015 Commercial Wheat Variety Characteristics[/caption] Email the author at: mike_carroll@ncsu.edu Follow the author on Twitter at: @mcarroll_craven The use of brand names and any mention or listing of commercial products or services in this publication does not imply endorsement by the NC Cooperative Extension Service nor discrimination against similar products or services not mentioned. Individuals who use agricultural chemicals are responsible for ensuring that the intended use complies with current regulations and conform to the product label. Be sure to examine a current product label before applying any product.

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Food Processing and Manufacturing Initiative

Food Processing and
Manufacturing Initiative

NC food processing and manufacturing initiative feasiblity study released The agricultural resources, industrial capacity and research innovation assets present in North Carolina create opportunities to catalyze development of value-added food processing and manufacturing businesses, according to a joint NC State-NCDA&CS economic feasibity study released Jan. 12. One page summary of the Initiative View the Full Report

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Craven County (pictured alphabetically), Wendy Paschal, Katherine Paul and Sarah Willis.

4-H Delegation
Attends Electric Congress

Craven County (pictured alphabetically), Wendy Paschal, Katherine Paul and Sarah Willis.[/caption] A delegation from Craven County attended the 68th annual 4-H Electric Congress July 13-15 at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. 180 4‑H’ers, adult leaders and N.C. Cooperative Extension agents from 54 counties attended the three-day event. Since 1947, Duke Energy and Dominion North Carolina Power have sponsored the annual congress to emphasize energy conservation and safe electricity use. The 4-H electric energy program is one of the most popular activities among Tar Heel 4-H’ers. For more information about this specific program within 4-H click here. The 4-H program is the youth education program of North Carolina Cooperative Extension, based at North Carolina State and North Carolina A&T State universities. More than 232,000 young people between the ages of 5 and 19 participate in North Carolina 4-H activities each year with the help of 20,563 adult and youth volunteers. Pictured from left are Sarah Willis, 16, daughter of Rusty and Etta Willis in New Bern; Katherine Paul, 13, daughter of Sheryl Harris in Grantsboro; Also, Wendy Garner Paschal, 4-H Youth Development Agent in Craven County.

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NC Cooperative Extension Service

NC Prepares for Avian
Influenza

The N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services is requiring all poultry owners, regardless of the number of birds, to register with NCFarmID.

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NC Cooperative Extension Service

Proposed Changes for
Pesticide License

The EPA recently released proposed rule changes for licensing and recertification for those applying Restricted Use Pesticides (RUP). EPA is accepting comments on the proposed changes until November 23, 2015. To comment, please see docket number EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-0183 at regulations.gov An overview of suggested changes can be downloaded HERE.  Additional information is also available at the EPA website, http://www2.epa.gov/pesticide-worker-safety/epa-proposes-stronger-standards-people-applying-riskiest-pesticides

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NEWS View All

Selecting Wheat Varieties for Craven County

To ensure high yield and low management, proper wheat varieties need to match soils, anticipated planting date, potential Hessian Fly infestations and known disease problems. NC State University provides annual evaluations of the MORE »

Ginkgo Leaves

Tree Talk: Meet the Ginkgo Tree

The Ginkgo tree is an ancient species that has much to offer in your landscape —especially their brilliant, but short lived fall color.  But you have to be a little… sexist… when you MORE » – from   Gardening

Animal Waste Operator Class

Six 1-hour credits available   Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2015 Time: 9AM – 4PM Location: Jones County Cooperative Extension Office 367A Hwy. 58 South, Trenton, NC 28585   Sponsored lunch will be provided. MORE »

Managing Cotton Defoliation in 2015

August is not typically when growers in this area defoliate cotton. However, given the seasonal variances, several key points need to be considered. First some fields have cut-out. These plants have a compact MORE »

Pork Quality Assurance Certification Class

Date: Tuesday, September 1, 2015 Time: 6PM Location: Jones County Cooperative Extension Office 367A Hwy. 58 South, Trenton, NC 28585 This certification class will be in time for the first show of the MORE »

smallclover

DID YOU KNOW?

4-H is the nation’s largest positive youth development and youth mentoring organization, empowering six million young people in the U.S. In partnership with 110 universities, 4-H life changing programs are research-backed & available MORE »

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EVENTS View All
Pork Quality Assurance Certification ClassTue Sep 1, 2015
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM— 4 days away
Eat Smart, Move More, Weigh LessWed Sep 2, 2015
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Where:
New Bern-Craven County Public Library , 400 Johnson Street, New Bern, NC, United States
— 5 days away
Peletah 4-H ClubWed Sep 2, 2015
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Where:
Peletah Ministries, Neuse Blvd, New Bern, NC
— 5 days away
MASTER GARDENER HELP DESKThu Sep 3, 2015
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Where:
Craven Ag Building, 300 Industrial Dr, New Bern, NC
— 6 days away
4-H Leader Lunch 'n' LearnFri Sep 4, 2015
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Where:
Cooperative Extension Services, 300 Industrial Drive, New Bern, NC 28562, United States
— 1 week away
Introduction to 4-H Project Record WorldTue Sep 8, 2015
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Where:
Cooperative Extension Services, 300 Industrial Drive, New Bern, NC 28562, United States
— 2 weeks away
Eat Smart, Move More, Weigh LessWed Sep 9, 2015
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Where:
New Bern-Craven County Public Library , 400 Johnson Street, New Bern, NC, United States
— 2 weeks away
Stanley White Rec Center Afterschool 4-H ClubWed Sep 9, 2015
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM Where:
Stanley White Rec Center, New Bern, NC
— 2 weeks away
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